It’s high time for a farm report!

Some of the hens going after a fresh treat of hay on a snowy day.

Some of the hens going after a fresh treat of hay on a snowy day.

Hens:  All our hens finally made it through molt, and all the chicks from last summer finally got big enough to lay.  Out of 20 hens, we are up to about 16 eggs a day–the most we’ve ever had!  Winter cold and short days interfered with their starting to lay quite a bit.  Originally, we installed a light in the coop, on a timer, to counter the short days.  Unbeknownst to us, though, it came unplugged at some point (I generally don’t make a habit of waking at 4:30 a.m. just to check the chicken’s light.  My commitment has its limits!).  So, the short days had its effect on the girls.  Nonetheless, a new one seems to be coming on line every day now, as the day length increases, and the weather warms slightly (we are up to 20* nightime lows!).  Five of the girls will soon be going to another home.  The other 15 are on a list with the state vet lab to be blood tested for Pullorum Typhoid (a particular strain of salmonella) when the testers come through our area in late March/April.  This test is required for any poultry crossing state lines, and since we are moving all the girls with us, it is required by law.  After all the testing and efforts we are going through to move these girls with us, I just pray the stress of the move doesn’t send them into another molt and delay laying by several months!  We might need to use eggs as bribes to our new neighbors as they adjust to our menagerie of animals and unique sounds that come from a farm like ours (nothing like a donkey braying for her dinner at 8 p.m.!)

Shiloh (front) and her jenny, Asha munching some breakfast.

Shiloh (front) and her jenny, Asha munching some breakfast.

Donkeys:  The donkeys are doing well.  They are probably the closest thing to pasture ornaments I’ve ever had at this point though.  Asha is a pistol at 9 months old–totally full of herself!  I haven’t worked with her as much as I’d like to thanks to the cold, but she is doing well despite that.  Shiloh seems to be enjoying her days, eating and caring for her youngster.  She is still very protective and will totally spaz out if Asha is taken from her (though she is fine with being taken away from Asha–go figure), but she gets better the more we work on it.  Asha is still nursing, so they are pretty close.  There really is no reason to discourage it at this point in time.  When I do saddle up Shiloh (maybe once a month right now–everything else is just bareback–she spends the first 30 seconds pouting, walking funny, and generally trying to convince me she’s never had a saddle on before.  When I threaten to make her trot a circle or two, she suddenly changes her mind and agrees to give rides to the kids.  She’s such a goof!  I love her personality–so gentle and sweet, yet so quick to let me know what she is thinking!  I am envisioning riding my draft horse (to be purchased after we move) down the trails at Red Gate, as my children follow closely on their donkeys.  I also have harnesses toward the top of my “to-buy” list, for after this CO house sells.  I hope to turn them into driving donkeys, so Asha will have a job until she is rideable in another 3 years.  I can also use them for smaller pulling tasks around the farm that way.  I recently trimmed both girls’ hooves.  I am getting increasingly confident with doing that job, and enjoy knowing that I’m saving a good $70 every two months!  It will probably save me more once I get my draft team (since most farriers charge more for the big ones).  For the sake of my out-of-shape and injured back though, I think I will have to learn to space hoof trims between the goats, donkeys, and horses, in such a way that I do about one animal a week instead of trying to pile them all into a day.

JR's colored buck, Jupiter, wanting out of his cage for some play time.

JR’s colored buck, Jupiter, wanting out of his cage for some play time.

Rabbits:  The original plan was to move 4 rabbits–2 does and 2 bucks.  Recently, however, a new doe that JR had raised (a kit of his favorite doe that died last year), was pregnant and contracted sniffles.  The day before she was due, she died.  JR was heartbroken.  We are down to 1 doe and 2 bucks now, and he is debating trying to get another doe out of one of his remaining litters, or just wait until we move and try a new line entirely.  He is really hoping to add some more color to his herd, so he is waiting to see if this colorful buck produces any colorful does in the next litter.  Our last doe is pregnant by him, due to kindle in about 2 weeks.  Her last litter is running free in the colony with Pelham, our American Chinchilla buck (the best babysitter anyone could want!), and they are due to be harvested in about 4 more weeks (we harvest at 12 weeks).

Faith (yellow collar), daughter Joy, and Latte in the back.

Faith (yellow collar), daughter Joy, and Latte in the back.

Goats:  We have our 3 Alpine does–Faith, daughter Joy, and Latte.  I am only milking once a day right now; Latte is producing about 3.5 lbs. a day (almost 1/2 gallon), while Faith is only giving about a pint.  I want to keep her going until I know she is pregnant.  Joy has been confirmed pregnant, and is due to kid around March 28.  She is our first scheduled, so we have a while yet.  I have asked S for a specific, 4th doe for Valentine’s (assuming the owner is willing to sell outright instead of trade like we had originally discussed).  Not sure if he’s taking me seriously.  After all, “goat” and “Valentine’s gift” aren’t usually too synonymous, I guess.  If that did happen to work out, the new doe is due to deliver about week after Joy.  I plan to blood test Latte and Joy next week, just to help me with my planning around the move.  After all our struggles getting them all bred and pregnant, I really hope they finally settled.  Neither has cycled since their last breeding, though, so I am hopeful.  I have my theories as to why they didn’t settle the first time or two.  IF they conceived, then Latte is due May 2–two weeks before we move!  Faith would be due June 7, meaning she would be traveling while pregnant, and then deliver at Red Gate.  That also means that, as hoped 2 breeding seasons ago, my former buck Stallion would be the sire of the first kids born at Red Gate!  It has also worked out that I have Joy and Latte, both daughters of Stallion, meaning that Stallion is essentially the foundation sire, and his line, Mamm-Key, will help build the basis of my dairy herd!  Other amazing lines in my girls include Harmody, Redwood Hills, Jailhaus, Cherry Glen, and Tempo Aquila.  If you know much about the Alpine lines, then you can understand how exciting it is that I have managed to tap into the hard work and careful breeding associated with those lines, all of which are known for high-quality, high-producing goats, many of which go on to win championships and/or milk stars.  I am just thrilled to be at that point as we head east where other lines are better known, and these girls will be considered “new blood.”

Athena, the ever-faithful, always-on-duty LGD

Athena, the ever-faithful, always-on-duty LGD

LGD:  Athena has a won a place on our farm for good!  In fact, she has probably won a place for livestock guardian dogs in general on our farm.  We have never had an issue with a predator when she was on duty, and we haven’t lost a single animal since S shot the rogue (possibly diseased) fox earlier this year.  In addition, we are pretty sure she has deterred a couple of humans possibly trying to steal a goat or two.  Her guarding brings us such piece of mind.  Back at Red Gate, there has recently been 2 sightings of cougar within 1/2 mile or so of our farm, and last year, a calf carcass was found in a tree not too far away.  We also just found out we now have a resident bald eagle, not to mention the surplus of raccoon, opossum, bobcat, coyote, fox, skunk, and deer–all of which enjoy at least one variety of the animals or crops that we plan to grow.  She’s a great dog, highly intelligent, and will likely have her work cut out for her there!  I am so thankful we took the opportunity to raise her here so she was ready when we moved.  Her only downside right now is that, at 18 months old and around 100 lbs., she still acts like a pup–albeit, a very large pup.  Her only playmates are the goats, who easily tire of her playful antics.  On occasion she also barks, we suspect, out of boredom. That fact, in addition to upcoming kidding season, in addition to the much larger acreage and increased wildlife she must patrol back east, we are considering getting her a playmate that will also help her patrol.  I am being choosy though, as I want a pup almost identical to her.  I am looking for a young (under about 4 months old) female pup that is 3/4 Great Pyrenees and 1/4 Anatolian Shepherd.  I LOVE this cross.  It has proven itself so well here in CO, that there are some folks trying to make an official breed out of it known as the “Colorado Mountain Dog.”  Unfortunately, their popularity here in CO makes their price outrageous.  I was very blessed to get Athena for the price I did, because the seller didn’t understand what exactly he had.  Therefore, if you happen to know of anyone selling a litter of this cross for an affordable price, and the pups will be around 2-4 months old AFTER April, please let me know.

A few live hives, and a few empty ones.  We are storing the empty ones outside just because we have no other area to put them at present, plus it looks better for home showings.

A few live hives, and a few empty ones. We are storing the empty ones outside just because we have no other area to put them at present, plus it looks better for home showings.

Honey Bees:  The bees seem to be hanging in there.  We have 3 hives that seem to have survived the winter.  I think we are past the danger zone at this point.  We are likely going to sell one before we move–a very hardy hive whose genetics have survived at least 3 CO winters (a VERY rare feat around here!).  Because they are so adapted here, we aren’t confident they would survive the heat and humidity of Red Gate.  We are probably going to move 2 other hives back east.  I have been working on getting more comfortable with the bees, as I replenished some of their honey stores, and learned how to handle some of the tools.  I will basically be having to handle them alone this summer and fall, so I want to be sure I have a clue what I’m doing.  Guess I will soon be able to add “Bee keeper” to my lengthy job description.

In other farm news, in preparation for moving, we bought our truck and have ordered our custom trailer, which will hopefully be here in about 4-6 more weeks.  I look forward to loading all the animals up for some trial arranging to see if our planned set-up will work for the move.  I am also working on a grain order to re-stock all our barrels prior to move.  I will lose my custom-grain source once we leave CO, and it is too expensive to ship.  I haven’t been able to find another source of organic grains closer to Red Gate, so I’m not sure what I will get when this is all gone.  Finally, we are still working on selling our house.  We have begun minimal packing to help eliminate any clutter and better stage the house.  We are continuing to work on needed repairs and improvements.  We show the house quite frequently, which makes us confident we have priced it right, and we have even received one offer.  Unfortunately, it was from a “city” guy who had no appreciation for the value of the land rights we have, as he didn’t care about animals.  He literally wanted to buy JUST the house, at a price just slightly above what we paid for it 2 years ago as a FORECLOSURE (which he got from public records).  S tried to explain that things don’t really work like that.  He is welcome to buy the place, and welcome to make a FAIR offer, but he couldn’t just buy the house and have us discount for everything he wasn’t interested in. In addition, he also wanted us to remove ALL fencing, shelters, and everything we had setup for animals.  That doesn’t bother us, as we could easily sell it around here.  It just didn’t seem to be a very good offer in general, so we declined.  We have had a couple folks return multiple times to look.  Most of the viewers are folks who still have to sell their house before they can get financing.  We have also had several requests to rent or to owner-finance, neither of which interests us.  We just want a no-hassle, easy sale and be done with it.  We are praying the right family will come along–perhaps even one that has dreams of taking that “next step” like we did, who can appreciate the work we did here, and who desire to be more sustainable and less dependent on the economy.  Who knows what God has in mind?  If we don’t get an acceptable offer by March, we will be listing it with our realtor (and raising the asking price considerably–closer to the realtor recommended–as a result).  We’ll see what happens.

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