Shortly after my last post, I wrote the following, as I’d much rather have a cheery blog rather than a depressed one:

“We are absolutely, totally, and completely IN LOVE with our team of draft horses!  Their primary job around the farm was skidding logs around the farm as we cleaned up our woodlands, but since S’s arm injury, their workload dropped.  We were worried they wouldn’t be quite as good at driving with what we feared was too-light of a workload.  God provided for us, though!

Horses

We were asked to be the “Wells Fargo Wagon” in a theater production of “The Music Man” at our local outdoor theater.  This theater draws crowds from all over the country. Even though they couldn’t afford to pay us much, they offered to give us a full page ad in the theater flyer for the rest of the season.  That was a HUGE deal for us, as we desperately needed the advertisement for our farm products and services.  So, right after S’s injury, almost every evening was spent at the theater.  We spent several nights at rehearsals, getting the horses used to the stage lights, crowd noises, applauding sounds, kids running around in the shadows, and the whole routine (we also had to carry the “professor” in the back of the wagon).  By opening night, they had the routine down.  They could not have been more perfect!!  We were so proud of our boys, and they were such a huge hit, the show was a sell-out almost every evening, and the townsfolk are still talking about it!  We had a great time, and made a few business contacts during the time we spent there.  It was a very small part, but here is a link to our part of the performance.  After this scene, we were set up in back for intermission, where the audience could come pet and ask questions about the horses while we just stood there for 30 minutes, then we were the opening scene for Act 2, as we trotted away.  Enjoy:   The Wells Fargo Wagon Performance

We are doing wagon rides in town every Saturday evening, which is another job to keep them going.  One evening, a local camera-man showed up, asked to take a few shots, video, and interview us for a “small” deal he produces and an article for the paper.  Again, interested in promoting our business, we gladly accepted.  One thing led to another, and he asked to come do the same at the farm itself.  Well, not only did he write a newspaper article, but he used the video footage to produce a mini-documentary that will soon be aired on the Fox station in 5 mid-west states!  If I’d understood that part, I’d of at least worn a little make-up.  After two hours of filming in the blazing sun and humidity, let’s just say that our appearance in the video is very authentic!  I can’t show you that until the footage airs, but hopefully that will be soon.  With the challenges we have faced recently, I have found myself watching that footage time and time again, to remind me why we love the life so much.  It was very well done, I thought!

In between, I am able to find a job or two each week to keep the horses busy and stimulated.  We are trying to wean ourselves off our 4-wheeler, so the horses can take over those jobs.  We are in the process of purchasing a fore-cart so we can take over the last job done by the 4-wheeler–pulling our mower.  Once we have it, though, I will be relieved to not eat so much dust while grading our driveway! Watch the horses grade the driveway here Despite the decreased workload, the horses are keeping their calm, easy-going dispositions.  I still long to ride them (never have), but just never can find the time to do all the needed prep work to get on.  They have never been ridden, and since I don’t have a saddle, I am hesitant to jump on bareback without a LOT of prep work.  With backs 6 feet high, that would be a very LONG way to the ground if they disagreed with me!  Nonetheless, I am enjoying everything about them, and greatly looking forward to what the future holds.”

About 18 hours after I wrote that post draft, the horses were turned out to graze in the orchard.  While grazing, Nick made his way down to where some chicken tractors (with sharp tin roofing) were being stored.  We don’t really know what happened next, but we heard a loud bang and ran out to find Nick’s front leg pouring blood everywhere!  He had punctured his knee all the way to the joint capsule, slicing the tendon sheath, but narrowly missing the tendon itself.  The entire front of his leg was laid open, with tissue hanging everywhere.  Blood pumped from small arteries with each step, so we quickly tried to stop his movement.

I confess, I totally lost it.  With everything from my last post, and now this, with all the fears for Nick and knowing what it meant for us, I absolutely lost it.  I was sobbing so hard, I could hardly get Nick’s leg wrapped and compressed to stop the blood flow.  My poor husband, with painful arms, was trying to hold Nick still and trying to comfort me at the same time.  Eventually I got control and did what I needed to do.

Many hours and a huge vet bill later, Nick is on stall rest for an unspecified period of time. It is touch and go for the moment.  He is using the leg, which is great news, but the opened joint capsule could get severely infected very easily, which would be very bad.  His leg is wrapped, under fairly tight compression, and has a drain to try to reduce the swelling over the next few days.  He is only allowed out of his stall twice a day for a short walk to graze a little, then back to the stall.  He is on twice daily doses of Bute to help with the pain.  He obviously is favoring the leg a lot, and has a tendency to drag and stumble on that hoof.  We won’t know for a couple of weeks if the stumbling is due to soreness or nerve damage.  We are praying it is not the latter.

nick

As far as our business goes, we are finished with wagon rides for the season, which was possibly looking to be our greatest income source.  I have lost the ability to do the work around the farm that the team was capable of as well.  The horses have been together as a team since the beginning, so I am going to try to re-train Bud to work as a single horse.  Today, I am just trying to teach him to graze alone, which is a feat in itself.  He wants only to stand beside Nick’s stall.  It will limit what I can move around the farm, but he’s still capable of pulling quite a bit of weight, so it’s better than nothing for sure.

Suffice it to say, this was a huge hit for us, financially, practically, and for me, emotionally.  As S said, we can really do nothing but pray, seek direction, and take things one day at a time.  I have faith this is a season, and all seasons will come to an end eventually.  I do have to give mention to the fact that, in the midst of all the crises, God still provides.  Yesterday evening, a group of church folks showed up with a huge meal, several chainsaws, and a tractor, and spent several hours working in our front field to help us get caught up on a big project.  It was a tremendous blessing, and really helped lift our spirits!  If you’d keep our situation in your prayers, though, I’d appreciate it.  We are still blessed in many ways, and have no doubt there are many who have much worse struggles than we are dealing with.  Sometimes–like when my horse is pouring blood, and I’m on the verge of another low blood sugar, we just have to remind ourselves of that.  God never promised us an easily life.  To the contrary, he warns in His word that the life of a believer is a hard road to travel.  He asked us to follow Him and remain faithful, despite the obstacles that life throws at us, but He also promises that He will be there, He will provide, and we will become better because of it.

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